RSS Journalism Award winners announced

Written by Oz Flanagan on . Posted in News

The winners of the 2013 awards for statistical excellence in journalism have been announced. Journalists at The Times, The Detail and BBC Radio 4 have been commended for their work. The awards, now in their seventh year, are made in three categories - print, broadcast and online - and recognise work first published or broadcast in the preceding calendar year.

The winner for work published in print is Daniel Finkelstein of The Times for his Fink Tank column. The judges felt that this was an excellent and accessible example of statistical modelling used as a vehicle to explain broadly applicable statistical concepts in an entertaining manner.

In the online category, Kathryn Torney (pictured) is the winner for her piece for The Detail examining integration in Northern Ireland’s schools. The judges were impressed by its use of Google Maps and felt its key strength was in enabling the reader to get beyond a conventionally presented story to find out relevant local data. This was done in a way that demonstrated how data can be used to go beyond political point-scoring.

In the broadcast category, the winner is BBC Radio 4’s More or Less programme presented by Tim Harford, produced by Richard Knight and edited by Richard Vadon. The judges considered this to be a really informative exploration of the contentious issue of waiting times at UK borders during the Olympics and the contrasting estimates of different agencies. They particularly highlighted how choice of data can have a big impact on the story that is told.

Dr Jenny Freeman, honorary officer for the Society’s external relations work, said: ‘This year saw the second largest number of entries to our awards for statistical excellence in journalism. There were many which showed good use of statistics and data. This presented the judges with the challenging task of deciding overall winners.

'Our congratulations go to those who have been successful, and our thanks to all those who submitted entries. It is very pleasing to see such a breadth of interest in using data and statistics by the journalist community.’